Ask Andrew W.K.: How Can I Quit Smoking For Good?

andrew-wk-metal-hammer-penguin.JPG
Courtesy of Metal Hammer
Andrew W.K.

[ Editor’s note: Every week, New York City’s own Andrew W.K. takes your life questions and sets you safely down the right path to a solution, a purpose, or — no surprise here — a party. Need his help? Just ask: AskAWK@villagevoice.com]

Dear Andrew W.K.,

I want to quit smoking. I’ve smoked off and on for the past ten years, and my smoking got really heavy over the past two years, sometimes almost three packs a day. It’s gotten so bad that for the first time I’ve decided I want to quit 100%. In the past, I tried to "cut back" or "taper off," but that would only be for a day or maybe two, and then pretty soon I’d end up resuming my smoking again full-on, only to then have it increase even more because it seemed I was powerless in reducing it. I’ve tried various methods, including patches, and they didn’t really work. I don’t know if you smoke now or ever smoked, but I thought maybe you might have some advice here.

Thanks,
All Smoked Out

Dear All Smoked Out,

I’ve smoked. I really wanted to be a smoker. For some reason, I wanted to see what the world of smoking was all about, so I put genuine effort into getting hooked. It eventually worked, and I smoked for several years. It felt like some sort of rite of passage, a genuine life experience that I was getting under my belt. It certainly bonded me with other smokers, and I was able to understand and have much more compassion for addicts that I hadn’t understood before.

After a few years of being a light smoker, I decided I should probably just stop smoking entirely. It never really occurred to me that smoking was bad for me. It always felt good, but I had started to notice that the good feelings and head rushes I used to get from smoking had dissipated and were replaced by new feelings of exhaustion and hollowness. It was like I could actually feel the cigarette draining the life out of me each time I inhaled, and rather than feel exhilarated and pleasurably dizzy, I felt this deep wave of fatigue and anxiety. It would take me five or ten minutes to bounce back and feel relatively normal again.

My smoking friends told me not to take those tired and sick feelings too seriously. They said, "You just work through those bad feelings by smoking more, and eventually they go away."

I threw away all the cigarettes I had and was determined to resist the urge to ask others to give me smokes. This worked for a while. I felt waves of temptation wash over me when I would see cigarette logos, advertising, and especially empty boxes littered on the street. I would kick the boxes open to see if there happened to be one inside. There never was, until one day, I kicked at box of Newport 100s, and to my amazement, there was one perfectly intact, beautiful, long cigarette still remaining in the corner of the pack.

I figured this was too good to pass up. It was a free pass. I immediately bought a BIC lighter and smoked the Newport. It was great and the whole experience of finding it was exciting and put me in a great mood. It felt like I had won a special game. I went back into the shop where I bought the lighter and decided to purchase a whole brand new pack of Newports. I smoked three as I walked home and by the time I got to my door, the good feelings had worn off and I realized I hadn’t quit smoking at all. So, now what?

It felt stupid to throw away this new, crisp, almost full pack of Newports, but I realized that if I didn’t toss them, I’d smoke them all and be smoking every day again. There was a very vague realization, way back in some blocked out and far away part of my mind, that I was hooked more deeply than I had thought and had begun to play small games with myself revolving around trying to find ways to smoke. I wasn’t fully aware of how those games would evolve. But they did.

In only a few days, I found myself back to kicking at empty cigarette boxes on the sidewalk. I longingly remembered the thrill of discovering that one surprise cigarette inside that discarded pack. I was sure if I found one like that again, it would be a well deserved little treat — just one smoke and that would be it. Maybe that’s how I could smoke from now on, only smoke when I’m lucky enough to find one in a pack on the ground. It seemed like a great and very fun plan. Last time, my only mistake had been buying that whole pack after just getting that one freebie off the ground. Next time, I would only have the one found cigarette and never buy a pack again in my life.

A few days later, as I was walking along and looking for cigarette boxes to kick, I noticed a perfectly good unsmoked cigarette laying in a crack on the sidewalk. I fished it out, examined it a bit, and determined that it was as clean and new as the one that I had discovered in the Newport box. It must’ve accidentally fallen out of someone’s pack as they fumbled with it. This was almost as fun as finding a cigarette still in the box, so I smoked it and felt pretty happy with myself. I didn’t immediately go and buy a new pack, and just left it at that. But by the next day, I was eyeing the ground more than ever, hoping to find more not-empty packs or accidentally unsmoked cigarettes.

My eyes darted across the pavement, and I could feel my standards lowering — only new cigarettes had become found cigarettes in packs on the ground. Suddenly I saw an almost unsmoked cigarette that was sort of bent and sitting by the corner of a building, like someone had gone out to have a really quick two-puff smoke break and then hastily snubbed it out. This was almost as good as finding a completely unsmoked cigarette. Who was I to complain?

I broke off the little smoked end, and snapped off the filter (where you could still see the previous smoker’s lipstick stains), and smoked it right there. It was strong without the filter, but I felt it was still pretty good. It had a harsher taste because it had been partially smoked, but I still felt like it was basically a new cigarette. I felt thrifty and resourceful. Never did I dream that in only a couple weeks time, this little game of scavenging cigarettes would evolve into me collecting any and all cigarette butts off the sidewalk, putting them in my pocket, and then re-rolling them at home into "new" cigarettes. All I cared about was that I wasn’t buying new packs of cigarettes. In my distorted mind, that meant I wasn’t a full-blown smoker. Meanwhile, the few people who were aware of my sidewalk butt hunting were completely disgusted and confused. It never occurred to me how warped my thinking had become.

This went on for many months, and eventually lead to me just buying regular cigarettes again, rolling tobacco, and becoming a heavier smoker than I ever had been before. When I decided to quit again after seven years of steady smoking, it was extremely challenging, probably one of the hardest things I had faced up ’til then. I did it cold turkey and didn’t use any method other than distraction. I don’t think willpower would’ve worked for me. I had to distract myself with life.

So, every time I would feel the urge to smoke, I would do something else instead that I needed to do anyway. The craving would be very strong, but eventually the activity would take over and the craving would pass and I would get something done in the meantime. It killed two birds with one stone. Sometimes I would feel the urge to smoke, so I’d complete a bunch of simple tasks in a row, like going to get the mail, taking out the trash, running some errands, and returning some phone calls. Other times, I would have to come up with tasks to do, especially when I was traveling. If I was at the airport and felt like smoking, instead of going outside into the drop-off area where everyone was having their last minute smokes, I would force myself to check in and go through security, just so it would be that much harder to go back out to smoke. This had the added side effect of helping me be much more on time for my flights.

Other times, I would clean up huge parts of my house that had grown disorganized, or answer a bunch of letters, or anything else I had been putting off. I realized that whenever I had been smoking, I was just sitting or standing around, not doing anything. I had wasted so much time, and I had so much that always needed to get done.

But the most effective thing I ever found to do when I had the urge to smoke was to exercise. It didn’t really matter what kind of exercise it was: I air-drummed, danced, did jumping jacks, push-ups, weights, stationary bikes, even just lifted my luggage at the airport over and over — anything other than smoking. The benefit was again two-fold, but with an added element. Unlike the other tasks like house chores and work, I noticed that the more I exercised, the less I physically felt like smoking. The cravings were tangeably reduced. It really felt like oil and water; smoking and exercise just didn’t mix. The greatest part was, it felt like I was truly turning something bad into something good. All the smoking was clearly damaging my body, and now I could take that exact craving and use it to motivate myself to get better. I had always been into exercise as a way to make my mind feel better, but I had never seen how it could reduce these kinds of negative cravings, too.

So, I can only tell you what worked for me. I absolutely understand people who haven’t had an easy time when it comes to quitting smoking. At times, the craving was so intense and brutal that it felt like I was having an out-of-body experience. But the craving will pass. It is different for everyone, but it is always possible. And I also don’t think it’s bad to smoke if someone wants to. I have a good friend who smokes, and he just feels that it’s an important part of what he’s meant to do in life. Who am I to say otherwise?

But if you do want to stop, there are clearly lots of options out there for quitting. Fortunately, it all comes down to one simple thing: Just don’t smoke. Do something else instead. Do something good for yourself when you feel the urge to smoke. This is a technique that can be applied to many challenging areas of life. When we have a bad feeling creeping in, use it as a direct stimulation to do something good in place of it. It starts a new kind of habit and a new kind of addiction: Getting addicted to becoming the kind of person you really want to be. Don’t give up.

Your friend,
Andrew W.K.

Read all of Andrew W.K.’s advice columns here.


Follow @soundofthecity


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http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/2015/05/ask_andrew_wk_how_can_i_quit_smoking_for_good.php
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Ask Andrew W.K.: How Can I Quit Smoking For Good?

andrew-wk-metal-hammer-penguin.JPG
Courtesy of Metal Hammer
Andrew W.K.

[ Editor’s note: Every week, New York City’s own Andrew W.K. takes your life questions and sets you safely down the right path to a solution, a purpose, or — no surprise here — a party. Need his help? Just ask: AskAWK@villagevoice.com]

Dear Andrew W.K.,

I want to quit smoking. I’ve smoked off and on for the past ten years, and my smoking got really heavy over the past two years, sometimes almost three packs a day. It’s gotten so bad that for the first time I’ve decided I want to quit 100%. In the past, I tried to "cut back" or "taper off," but that would only be for a day or maybe two, and then pretty soon I’d end up resuming my smoking again full-on, only to then have it increase even more because it seemed I was powerless in reducing it. I’ve tried various methods, including patches, and they didn’t really work. I don’t know if you smoke now or ever smoked, but I thought maybe you might have some advice here.

Thanks,
All Smoked Out

Dear All Smoked Out,

I’ve smoked. I really wanted to be a smoker. For some reason, I wanted to see what the world of smoking was all about, so I put genuine effort into getting hooked. It eventually worked, and I smoked for several years. It felt like some sort of rite of passage, a genuine life experience that I was getting under my belt. It certainly bonded me with other smokers, and I was able to understand and have much more compassion for addicts that I hadn’t understood before.

After a few years of being a light smoker, I decided I should probably just stop smoking entirely. It never really occurred to me that smoking was bad for me. It always felt good, but I had started to notice that the good feelings and head rushes I used to get from smoking had dissipated and were replaced by new feelings of exhaustion and hollowness. It was like I could actually feel the cigarette draining the life out of me each time I inhaled, and rather than feel exhilarated and pleasurably dizzy, I felt this deep wave of fatigue and anxiety. It would take me five or ten minutes to bounce back and feel relatively normal again.

My smoking friends told me not to take those tired and sick feelings too seriously. They said, "You just work through those bad feelings by smoking more, and eventually they go away."

I threw away all the cigarettes I had and was determined to resist the urge to ask others to give me smokes. This worked for a while. I felt waves of temptation wash over me when I would see cigarette logos, advertising, and especially empty boxes littered on the street. I would kick the boxes open to see if there happened to be one inside. There never was, until one day, I kicked at box of Newport 100s, and to my amazement, there was one perfectly intact, beautiful, long cigarette still remaining in the corner of the pack.

I figured this was too good to pass up. It was a free pass. I immediately bought a BIC lighter and smoked the Newport. It was great and the whole experience of finding it was exciting and put me in a great mood. It felt like I had won a special game. I went back into the shop where I bought the lighter and decided to purchase a whole brand new pack of Newports. I smoked three as I walked home and by the time I got to my door, the good feelings had worn off and I realized I hadn’t quit smoking at all. So, now what?

It felt stupid to throw away this new, crisp, almost full pack of Newports, but I realized that if I didn’t toss them, I’d smoke them all and be smoking every day again. There was a very vague realization, way back in some blocked out and far away part of my mind, that I was hooked more deeply than I had thought and had begun to play small games with myself revolving around trying to find ways to smoke. I wasn’t fully aware of how those games would evolve. But they did.

In only a few days, I found myself back to kicking at empty cigarette boxes on the sidewalk. I longingly remembered the thrill of discovering that one surprise cigarette inside that discarded pack. I was sure if I found one like that again, it would be a well deserved little treat — just one smoke and that would be it. Maybe that’s how I could smoke from now on, only smoke when I’m lucky enough to find one in a pack on the ground. It seemed like a great and very fun plan. Last time, my only mistake had been buying that whole pack after just getting that one freebie off the ground. Next time, I would only have the one found cigarette and never buy a pack again in my life.

A few days later, as I was walking along and looking for cigarette boxes to kick, I noticed a perfectly good unsmoked cigarette laying in a crack on the sidewalk. I fished it out, examined it a bit, and determined that it was as clean and new as the one that I had discovered in the Newport box. It must’ve accidentally fallen out of someone’s pack as they fumbled with it. This was almost as fun as finding a cigarette still in the box, so I smoked it and felt pretty happy with myself. I didn’t immediately go and buy a new pack, and just left it at that. But by the next day, I was eyeing the ground more than ever, hoping to find more not-empty packs or accidentally unsmoked cigarettes.

My eyes darted across the pavement, and I could feel my standards lowering — only new cigarettes had become found cigarettes in packs on the ground. Suddenly I saw an almost unsmoked cigarette that was sort of bent and sitting by the corner of a building, like someone had gone out to have a really quick two-puff smoke break and then hastily snubbed it out. This was almost as good as finding a completely unsmoked cigarette. Who was I to complain?

I broke off the little smoked end, and snapped off the filter (where you could still see the previous smoker’s lipstick stains), and smoked it right there. It was strong without the filter, but I felt it was still pretty good. It had a harsher taste because it had been partially smoked, but I still felt like it was basically a new cigarette. I felt thrifty and resourceful. Never did I dream that in only a couple weeks time, this little game of scavenging cigarettes would evolve into me collecting any and all cigarette butts off the sidewalk, putting them in my pocket, and then re-rolling them at home into "new" cigarettes. All I cared about was that I wasn’t buying new packs of cigarettes. In my distorted mind, that meant I wasn’t a full-blown smoker. Meanwhile, the few people who were aware of my sidewalk butt hunting were completely disgusted and confused. It never occurred to me how warped my thinking had become.

This went on for many months, and eventually lead to me just buying regular cigarettes again, rolling tobacco, and becoming a heavier smoker than I ever had been before. When I decided to quit again after seven years of steady smoking, it was extremely challenging, probably one of the hardest things I had faced up ’til then. I did it cold turkey and didn’t use any method other than distraction. I don’t think willpower would’ve worked for me. I had to distract myself with life.

So, every time I would feel the urge to smoke, I would do something else instead that I needed to do anyway. The craving would be very strong, but eventually the activity would take over and the craving would pass and I would get something done in the meantime. It killed two birds with one stone. Sometimes I would feel the urge to smoke, so I’d complete a bunch of simple tasks in a row, like going to get the mail, taking out the trash, running some errands, and returning some phone calls. Other times, I would have to come up with tasks to do, especially when I was traveling. If I was at the airport and felt like smoking, instead of going outside into the drop-off area where everyone was having their last minute smokes, I would force myself to check in and go through security, just so it would be that much harder to go back out to smoke. This had the added side effect of helping me be much more on time for my flights.

Other times, I would clean up huge parts of my house that had grown disorganized, or answer a bunch of letters, or anything else I had been putting off. I realized that whenever I had been smoking, I was just sitting or standing around, not doing anything. I had wasted so much time, and I had so much that always needed to get done.

But the most effective thing I ever found to do when I had the urge to smoke was to exercise. It didn’t really matter what kind of exercise it was: I air-drummed, danced, did jumping jacks, push-ups, weights, stationary bikes, even just lifted my luggage at the airport over and over — anything other than smoking. The benefit was again two-fold, but with an added element. Unlike the other tasks like house chores and work, I noticed that the more I exercised, the less I physically felt like smoking. The cravings were tangeably reduced. It really felt like oil and water; smoking and exercise just didn’t mix. The greatest part was, it felt like I was truly turning something bad into something good. All the smoking was clearly damaging my body, and now I could take that exact craving and use it to motivate myself to get better. I had always been into exercise as a way to make my mind feel better, but I had never seen how it could reduce these kinds of negative cravings, too.

So, I can only tell you what worked for me. I absolutely understand people who haven’t had an easy time when it comes to quitting smoking. At times, the craving was so intense and brutal that it felt like I was having an out-of-body experience. But the craving will pass. It is different for everyone, but it is always possible. And I also don’t think it’s bad to smoke if someone wants to. I have a good friend who smokes, and he just feels that it’s an important part of what he’s meant to do in life. Who am I to say otherwise?

But if you do want to stop, there are clearly lots of options out there for quitting. Fortunately, it all comes down to one simple thing: Just don’t smoke. Do something else instead. Do something good for yourself when you feel the urge to smoke. This is a technique that can be applied to many challenging areas of life. When we have a bad feeling creeping in, use it as a direct stimulation to do something good in place of it. It starts a new kind of habit and a new kind of addiction: Getting addicted to becoming the kind of person you really want to be. Don’t give up.

Your friend,
Andrew W.K.

Read all of Andrew W.K.’s advice columns here.


Follow @soundofthecity


Sponsor Content

We Recommend


http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/2015/05/ask_andrew_wk_how_can_i_quit_smoking_for_good.php
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See which apps Google awarded for their awesome material designs Threads

Last year at Google I/O, Google announced  a completely new design standard with material design. The Android community quickly fell in love material design, and it wasn’t hard to forget the Holo design of old.

Over the last year, thousands of Android apps have adopted the new standard with beautifully simple designs with bright colors. Google has decided to award some of the apps that have embraced the material design standard the best with what they’re calling the Material Design Showcase. This is a special landing page in the Google Play store specifically for these apps with “best in-class Android design.” Currently, 18 apps are featured in the showcase.

In addition to the Material Design Showcase, six apps have been given Material Design Awards by Google. The apps with reasons for the awards follow:

  • B&H Photo Video Audio Pro for Immersive Imagery
  • New York Times for Elegant Typography
  • Pocket for Adaptive Layouts
  • Pocket Casts for Seamless Browsing
  • Tumblr for Delightful Animation
  • Weather Timeline for Crafted Simplicity

You can see highlights of these all the featured apps in action in the featured video, or you can hop on over to the Material Design Showcase to download them and try them out for yourself.

How do you feel about Google’s favorite material designed apps? Do you love the designs of these apps too? Do you feel like Google missed some great ones? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below!


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/see-which-apps-google-awarded-for-their-awesome-material-designs/
http://androidandme.com/category/news/

Android M is making device switches more convenient with new Auto Backup Threads

Google I/O 2015 has brought a host of announcements regarding new Android M features and updates to apps we already know and love. Something that was not mentioned during yesterday’s keynote was the auto backup feature that will come with Android M.

Rather than storing app data on you device, Android M will allow developers to store app data on your Google Drive. This means that if you ever get a new phone or need to get your phone replaced, as soon as you re-install your favorite apps and open them, they’ll be right back to the way they were on your last device. I’m hoping this will be the same across devices too like between phones and tablets. Regardless, the app will use your Google Account for its login data, and by the time you open the app on the new device, all of the previous data will be there. It sounds like it should be a seamless experience.

One of the coolest parts about this Android M Auto Backup is how easy it sounds for developers to implement. Unfortunately, it will only work for the Android M operating system versions and up, but it’s so easy to implement your favorite apps will already have Auto Backup by the time you get there. You’ll never have to re-setup apps again. All that developers need to do is download the M developer SDK and rebuild the app against it to begin having the apps auto backup to your Google Drive. Obviously there are ways for developers to control what is and isn’t backed up if they want, but it sounds like Google has made this a fairly straightforward process.

So, are apps going to hog a bunch of your mobile data now that they’re backing up to Google Drive all the time? No. Backups will only run when the device is idle, connected to WiFi, and charging. Plus, they will not backup more than once per day, and the apps have no control over scheduling the backups. Additionally, Google is only allowing apps to backup a total of 25MB of data. This data is encrypted and does not count against your Drive quota (which is rad). If the app hits the 25MB limit, it will stop backing up. Therefore, developers need to keep their stored data tidy so that we can take advantage of this awesomeness.

So, who’s excited about this new Android M feature? I know I am. Maybe it’s because I work for Android and Me and handle lots of different phones, but redoing app setting all the time does get old. I’m ready for a smarter, more seamless experience. How about you? If you want to learn more, check out the video in the post. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/android-m-is-making-devices-switches-more-convenient-with-new-auto-backup/
http://androidandme.com/category/news/

Google ATAP’s Project Jacquard creating interactive textiles Threads

Project Jacquard

Google ATAP is constantly announcing cool new projects for the future, and the latest is Project Jacquard. It’s not just some new high tech device though, but instead a push for creating interactive textiles. The new Jacquard yarn looks and feels like normal yarn, but is made out of conductive threads.

This yarn can be woven into any fabric, both visibly and invisibly, and used as an interactive touch pad. You’ll be able to control devices by touching a patch on your clothes, which is an awesome idea. Swiping your sleeve or pants pocket could activate your phone.

The only issue is the other stuff other than the yarn, like chips and batteries, that accompany the yarn. This has to be miniaturized to fit in clothes without being felt, which is currently not possible. That’s where Project Jacquard comes in. Google has partnered with textile producers and designers to work on bringing this technology to the market.

We may not see it for a while, but it’s exciting to think our clothes could be interactive sometime soon. Watch the video below for more information and tell us what you think!


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/google-ataps-project-jacquard-creating-interactive-textiles/
http://androidandme.com/category/news/

Google’s Hands Free payment service is exactly what it sounds like Threads

googlehandsfreeaam

With the debut of Android Pay, Google doubled its number of mobile payments services. Now another has been revealed, bringing the total number of Google payment services to three.

Google Hands Free is a new payment system that, well, will let you pay for things without using your hands. The demo video shows a person simply telling the cashier that she’d like to “pay with Google,” and then the cashier tells her that’s she’s all set. Google says that your full credit card info won’t be shared with retailers and that when you do successfully make a payment, you’ll get an alert on your phone.

Hands Free is going to launch in preview mode this year, but it’s only going to be available in the San Francisco Bay Area initially. So far, only two businesses have been announced for the Hands Free program: McDonald’s and Papa John’s.

Google’s not saying much else about Hands Free, so it’s not clear exactly how the service works. Hands Free definitely looks cool, though, making contactless payments even easier than they are with a smartwatch or smartphone. Simply saying that you’d like to pay with Google will eliminate the time that you’d take to fumble through a wallet, fish your phone out of your pocket, or contort your wrist to meet the contactless payment terminal.

Here’s to hoping that Hands Free expands beyond San Francisco quickly.


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/googles-hands-free-payment-service-is-exactly-what-it-sounds-like/
http://androidandme.com/category/news/

The Nine Best Concerts in New York This Weekend, 5/29/15

elephante11.jpg
Photo Courtesy of Venue Nightclub (Vancouver, BC)
Elephante

For more shows throughout the weekend, check out our New York Concert Calendar, which we update daily.

Friday, 5/29
Billy Idol
JBL Live at Pier 97
6 p.m., $52.50
Billy Idol‘s early admiration for the Sex Pistols, the Who, and the Beatles gave his music an uplifting yet edgy quality that instantly made his punk yearning stand out, first with Generation X and later as a solo artist. As one of MTV’s first real stars, Idol quickly became even more popular with videos for his most famous songs, including "Dancing With Myself," "White Wedding," and the strange "Eyes Without a Face." Idol’s persona and stage presence are still as infectious as his music. As a part of his Kings & Queens of the Underground Tour, which is also the title of his most recent album, Idol will perform with support from Cayetana. Start your Friday night early and catch the angsty, gritty fun that Idol has embodied for decades. — Eleanor Lambert

Einsiferum + Korpiklaani + Trollfest
Irving Plaza
7 p.m., $39.50
For those who aren’t aware, folk metal is a thing. And while that may seem like a pairing of opposites — the simple quietude of folk music and the brash blitzkrieg of metal — they work quite well together. That is, if you don’t take it too seriously. Finnish band Korpiklaani rock like a party boat of drunken pirates, jigging to accordions, violins, galloping drums, and electric guitars. (Who wouldn’t want to be at that party?) Einsiferum, also from Finland, could be the Off-Off-Broadway soundtrack to Vikings! The Musical!, which doesn’t exist, but you get the idea. (Actually, there is a musical called Yo, Vikings! But we digress.) Joining them are Trollfest, from Norway. — Linda Leseman

Select Summer Fridays
The Standard Hotel
3 p.m., FREE
Select Summer Fridays are back, so start the weekend just a tad bit early with The Standard’s weekly summer party. Between that infamous Le Bain panorama of Manhattan, the delicious (albeit overpriced) drinks, and the beaming sunshine, Select Summer Fridays will reinvigorate your love for Manhattan, not to mention your capacity for an afternoon buzz. #rooflife returns yet again, with Jules Kim. 21+. — Eleanor Lambert

Elephante
Lavo
11 p.m., $20 – $30+
It’s not everyday that a Harvard graduate becomes one of the freshest (and not to mention incredibly talented) progressive house DJs, but that’s exactly what Elephante did. After graduating in 2011, he released a number of remixes that landed at Hype Machine’s #1 spot. His sound is undeniably melodic, but it hits harder than those of his competing producers. Deep, rawboned builds explode into drops that, if heard through a speaker, would make your pant legs flap. Nearly every one of his songs has elements from all across the dance music spectrum, with trap high-hats, deep house elementals, and straight up house synth-drops. What’s more, he actually has every song freely availalbe for download on his website, iamtheelephante.com, so check it out and get yourself prepared for his upcoming NYC show. The show is 21+, and make sure to show up before midnight to ensure entry! Sam Pace opens. — Eleanor Lambert

On the next page: Picks for Saturday and Sunday

Location Info

Map


JBL Live at Pier 97

Hudson River Park at W 55th St, New York, NY

Category: Music

Show additional locations »

Irving Plaza

17 Irving Place, New York, NY

Category: Music

The Standard Hotel

848 Washington St., New York, NY

Category: Music

Lavo

39 E. 58th St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Mezzrow

163 West 10th Street, New York, NY

Category: Music

Jazz at Lincoln Center, Appel Room

33 w. 60th St., New York, NY

Category: Music

Brooklyn Bowl

61 Wythe Ave., Brooklyn, NY

Category: Music

Saint Vitus Bar

1120 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn, NY

Category: Restaurant

Palisades

906 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY

Category: General


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Lonnie Holley and Cults Grapple with the Legacy of a NYC Electronic Music Legend

lonnie-holley-Dust-to-Digital.JPG
Courtesy of Dust-to-Digital
Lonnie Holley

Arthur Russell’s music wasn’t meant to be heard — or the vast majority of it wasn’t, at least. Russell, a notorious perfectionist, only released two studio albums. The rest of his sprawling canon comes from posthumous releases, stitched from unfinished sketches.

The tension between Russell’s ambition and reality resonates with Brian Oblivion of New York indie pop group Cults, who will perform alongside numerous musical talents and luminaries at Master Mix: Red Hot + Arthur Russell, Red Bull Music Academy and Red Hot’s tribute to the electronic composer and musician May 29 and May 30.

"It’s inspiring as a musician to experience someone re-emerging with their perfectionism obliterated, and their stuff just shown," he explains. "It makes you re-evaluate the way you criticize yourself, and the way you manicure things for days and hours and weeks. There’s a raw emotionality in everything he did. That’s what we’re all chasing is the freedom of being yourself, and that’s a tough thing to do. He really nailed it."

Freedom lies at the center of Arthur Russell’s journey. He struggled against convention, whether that meant collaborating with Allen Ginsberg on spoken word and cello suites or challenging New York’s avant-garde scene with disco experiments.

"He seems like a fearless guy who was willing to show every side of his personality on record," Oblivion adds. If there’s any American musician as unbound as Russell in his quest for truth and self-exploration, it’s Lonnie Holley, a 65-year-old musician and sculptor from Alabama with a searing vision of art as self-ideation, born of monumental pain and solitude.

The seventh of 27 children, his mother sold him to an abusive foster home when he was a toddler. He ran away at five years old and spent much of his childhood hiding alone in a movie theater. He ate scraps from the floor and watched movies instead of going to school. As a teenager he spent a year chained to a pile of rocks in a brutal detention facility. Years later, when a niece and nephew died in a fire, he began making sculpture and music. His work looms large over twentieth-century American folk art.

"I think Arthur’s music is more like my life as a little boy, living at the drive-in theater and hearing all the music that comes along with the movie," Holley reveals. "Part of it was born in him; a lot of it he inherited as he grew into the musician that he was, and then he put it all together. It’s a mixture. People say we have a sixth sense — is that our hearing, our capability, our way of doing music?"

On the next page: "The instrument itself can be destroyed, busted, tore up, and the music that has been recorded from it can go on and outlive this material existence"

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http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/2015/05/cults_lonnie_holley_arthur_russell_rbma.php
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Google and Qualcomm collaborating on new Project Tango smartphone with Snapdragon 810 processor Threads

qualcommprojecttangophone

The string of big Google I/O announcements carried into the second day of the conference with a tease of the next Project Tango smartphone.

Qualcomm says that it’s building the next Project Tango smartphone and that the reference device will be powered by a Snapdragon 810 processor and an Adreno 430 GPU. The device will also have the array of sensors and cameras that are typically found on Project Tango hardware, like a depth camera, motion tracking camera, RGB camera, gyroscope, and accelerometer.

If you’ll remember all the way back to February 2014, Google actually announced a smartphone with the debut of Project Tango. However, that phone never really seemed to make its way to many developers hands. And in the process of making another smartphone, especially one that’s powered by a Snapdragon processor, Google is helping to expand Project Tango’s availability even further and getting the platform to play nicely with Qualcomm’s silicon.

There aren’t many details available about Qualcomm’s Project Tango smartphone, but a registration page for the device says that its development platform is coming this summer, so it may not be much longer before more details on the device are revealed. If you just can’t wait until then to Tango with Google, the company will sell you a Project Tango tablet for $512.


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/google-and-qualcomm-collaborating-on-new-project-tango-smartphone-with-snapdragon-810-processor/
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Google Wallet isn’t going away, but its focus has changed Threads

image Google Wallet

With the announcement of Android Pay at yesterday’s Google I/O keynote event, many assumed that Android Pay would be replacing Google Wallet. As it turns out, Google Wallet isn’t going anywhere, but it is getting a major shift in focus. While Android Pay will now serve as the hub for mobile transactions, Google Wallet will become the destination for peer-to-peer payments, allowing users to quickly send money directly to others using debit cards, even if the other person doesn’t have Google Wallet.

Peer-to-peer payments have long been a part of Google Wallet, but they’re now becoming the app’s primary function. From what we can tell, all of the other functions will be stripped from the app and moved into Android Pay. Google Wallet users who receive money will have it sent directly to their bank account or they can spend it using a physical Google Wallet card.

Google Wallet may not be going anywhere, but it’s definitely become the sideshow. Android Pay is Google’s new service that will directly compete with Apple Pay, among other competitors. The new app for Google Wallet will be released in the coming months, likely around the same time or following the release of Android Pay. When more news is available, we’ll be sure to keep you notified.


http://androidandme.com/2015/05/news/google-wallet-isnt-going-away-but-its-focus-has-changed/
http://androidandme.com/category/news/